London Spy School

Agents received theoretical and practical instruction on their undercover work in Ieland. They would then be sent to Ireland in various roles.

Set up in Jul 1920, it was originally run by Tegart and Denham until Nov 1920. For a number of reasons they resigned in Nov 1920, and the running was taken over by Jeffries and Cameron until Mar 1921, when it appears to have been closed

This is probably also the House Guards/Whitehall court Spy School that Jeffries CV refers to Major later Brig William Francis Jeffries 1891 - 1969. Intelligence Dublin and Horse Guards 1920 to 1921

Biggs has an address "Horse Guards Annexe, Carlton House Terrace, London SW1" in 1919 which I am fairly sure is the Spy School.

Headquarters, London District, Horse Guards Annexe, 12, Carlton House Terrace, London, S.W.I. 17th December, 1918.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlton_House_Terrace

Dublin Castle Intelligence

Soldiers were, usually, badged to the Royal Fusiliers. I have to say ‘usually’ because, being an odd lot, some who were transferred in insisted on wearing the badge of their unit of origin. Take Pte Cousins, for example, a French speaker who joined from the HAC and insisted on wearing their badge. Generally, though, all soldiers, including the Intelligence Police, were banded to the 10th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, Intelligence (B). NCO’s on Intelligence Police duty often wore a brassard with the letters “IC”, or a bracelet noting the soldier’s name, number and inscribed ‘10th RF INTceB’ with the number of the Army to which the soldier was attached. Recruits joined at Hounslow Barracks.

As an example, nothing to do with Ireland - Percy John Smith was transferred to the Criminal Investigation Department at Scotland Yard. On the outbreak of hostilities in 1914, his police career was temporarily curtailed. Percy Smith was selected for Army Intelligence and was posted to the 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. This regimental assignment was merely a paper front to disguise the true identity of the ‘Hush-Hush Brigade’ as they became known by their police colleagues. ‘I was hastily equipped with a uniform at Hounslow Barracks, attested as a soldier, and given the rank of staff-sergeant in the 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. My arms consisted of a large Webley revolver and twenty-five rounds of ammunition. A large tin of bully, about five pounds of cheese, and some hard biscuits were then pressed upon me, and I made my way to Southampton, where I embarked with hundreds of other soldiers in a coal steamer that had been hurriedly converted into a military transport.’

 

ROYAL FUSILIERS (10th SERVICE BATTALION). Hansard 6 Jul 1915

Mr. NIELD asked the Under-Secretary of State for War (1) whether the standard of efficiency of the non-commissioned officers and men of the 10th Service Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers is so high that already and under very restrictive administration nearly 200 commissions have been granted to men; whether he is aware that there are no less than 600 of the men of this battalion who are in every respect competent to receive commissions and who are of much more value than the many persons who are daily receiving commissions; and whether, having regard to these circumstances and also to the suitability of the men from a social point of view, he will cause the restrictions which at present preclude these men applying for commissions to be removed; and (2) whether, owing to the standard of efficiency attained by the non-commissioned rank and file in the 10th Service Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers and having regard to the circumstances that socially and in all other respects they are of the class from which the best officers are obtained, he will consider if the interests of the country will be better served by offering commissions to such of the rank and file of this battalion as are desirous of accepting them, and so distributing them over various regiments rather than sacrificing these men as a unit to the exigencies of service in the field?

Mr. TENNANT Commissions have been granted to a considerable number of noncommissioned officers and men of the 10th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, and recommendations are still being received from the commanding officer of that battalion, who has instructions to submit the names of all soldiers serving in his unit who are candidates for appointment to commissions and whom he can recommend as in all respects suitable for such appointment, provided the efficiency of the unit as a whole does not suffer. I do not know what the number may be of those who are eligible for recommendation on these conditions, but I am sure the hon. Gentleman will recognise that it must be left to the commanding officer to decide whether any particular soldier shall or shall not be recommended at once for a commission.